Police Officer used forged signature to obtain search warrant

Updated: Jan 17, 2021

The officer formerly based in West London received a caution for perverting the course of justice.


In June 2018, former PC Halkon applied for two warrants at Uxbridge Magistrates’ Court as instructed by her line manager. On 19 July 2018 just prior to the warrants being executed, former PC Halkon admitted that she had forged the signature on one of them.


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On the 9th of December 2019 the former pc accepted a caution for perverting the course of justice.


A statement was issued via the Metropolitan Police website:


It was alleged that former Police Constable Ruth Halkon had breached the standards of professional behaviour in relation to Honesty and Integrity, Orders and Instructions and Discreditable Conduct.
In June 2018, former PC Halkon applied for two warrants at Uxbridge Magistrates’ Court as instructed by her line manager. On 19 July 2018 just prior to the warrants being executed, former PC Halkon admitted that she had forged the signature on one of them.
On 9 December 2019, former PC Halkon accepted a caution for perverting the course of justice, the circumstances being that she had copied and pasted a magistrate’s signature onto a search warrant she had applied for.
Having considered all of the evidence provided by the appropriate authority and from the former officer, Assistant Commissioner for Professionalism, Helen Ball found that the former officer had committed misconduct only in relation to the allegations under the professional standards of Discreditable Conduct and Orders and Instructions.
AC Ball found no breach of Honesty and Integrity. If the former officer was still employed by the MPS she would not have been dismissed.